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Conservative Group Launches Campaign To Repeal Death Penalty In Ohio

Hannah Cox (right), national manager of Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty, introduces the group: GOP strategist Michael Hartley, former death penalty juror Ross Geiger, son of murder victim Jonathan Mann and Rep. Laura Lanese (R-Grove City).
Hannah Cox (right), national manager of Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty, introduces the group: GOP strategist Michael Hartley, former death penalty juror Ross Geiger, son of murder victim Jonathan Mann and Rep. Laura Lanese (R-Grove City).

A national group of conservatives that oppose capital punishment has made Ohio the 14th state for its campaign to repeal of the death penalty. The group says the time is right to come to Ohio, which has been one of the leading states for executions.

Republicans with Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty say it’s inconsistent with pro-life views, is too expensive, and is a failed government policy riddled with errors and inefficiency.

There are 35 Ohioans who’ve signed onto the group Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty, including former Gov. Bob Taft, former attorney general Jim Petro and former congressman Pat Tiberi. But only three are current officeholders who could propose or vote on a repeal.

One is Rep. Laura Lanese (R-Grove City), the House majority whip.

“We’re starting to hear from the leadership at this state, and I think that’s where it’s got to start. And I do hear it among my colleagues. I just saw one of them in here a few minutes ago who’s very passionate about this issue, and I do think we will see more conservatives getting on board with this," Lanese said.

And longtime GOP strategist Michael Hartley said those who are and will be involved eventually are influential.

“I’ll go to war with those folks any damn day, because all we do and have done is win in Ohio.”

Republican House Speaker Larry Householder has said the cost has made him less supportive of the death penalty, and Republican Gov. Mike DeWine has delayed executions since taking office, saying finding drugs are a problem.

But prosecutors strongly oppose repeal and have argued against measures that would pull back on the death penalty, including a bill that would ban it for people who have severe mental illnesses.

 

Copyright 2021 The Statehouse News Bureau. To see more, visit The Statehouse News Bureau.