© 2021 WOSU Public Media
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Redistricting Yields New Ohio Legislative Maps Without Bipartisan Support

Republican Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, foreground, speaks to state Sen. Vernon Sykes, seated, the co-chair of the Ohio Redistricting Commission, as other members of the panel prepared for a meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus.
Julie Carr Smyth
/
AP
Republican Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, foreground, speaks to state Sen. Vernon Sykes (D-Akron), seated, the co-chair of the Ohio Redistricting Commission, as other members of the panel prepared for a meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus.

Midnight last night was the deadline for the Ohio Redistricting Commission to pass a map for state House and Senate districts.

The goal based on the 2015 voter-approved amendment to the Ohio Constitution was bipartisanship. State leaders including Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine voiced their disappointment after the lack of a compromise.

“The objective is to get a bipartisan map, and that is obviously a more difficult thing than to get a partisan map, we could vote now and get a partisan map for four years but that's not really the objective," the governor said.

Shortly after midnight with a 5-2 vote along party lines, Republicans approved a four-year map that would likely secure a supermajority for their party.

We look at Ohio’s new state legislative maps and the process that got us here.

Guests:

If you have a disability and experience difficulty accessing this content request an alternative format.