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Presidential Pardon Power

 President Donald Trump speaks during a roundtable discussion with African-American supporters in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in Washington.
Patrick Semansky
/
AP
President Donald Trump speaks during a roundtable discussion with African-American supporters in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in Washington.

President Trump in December sparked controversy when he granted pardons to numerous political cronies, including convicted felons Paul Manafort and Roger Stone.

The presidential pardon is a time-honored tradition for outgoing presidents, but critics argue these pardons are a clear reward for previous loyalty.

Many are speculating that, in the final days of his presidency, Trump may preemptively pardon his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, the Trump children and even himself.

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher we explore the history of the pardon power, why the founders thought it was a good idea, and why some legal experts believe it is, if anything, underused.

Guests:

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