© 2021 WOSU Public Media
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Voter Suppression

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose marks National Registration Day at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019.
Julie Carr Smyth
/
Associated Press
Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose marks National Registration Day at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019.

Voter rolls are the gateway to voting, and to ensure that the information they contain is accurate, states periodically remove or purge the names of voters who have moved, died or are otherwise ineligible to vote.

In a perfect system, the story would end there, but obviously the system is not. Voter purges have become an increasingly contentious issue, with people arguing that they suppress the right to vote. 

In 2019, Ohio purged its voter rolls but did so in a way that incorrectly targeted thousands of Ohioans. 

Coming up today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: Voter purges, why are they necessary, and how do they factor in to America’s long history of voter suppression. 

Guests:

  • Doug Caruso, Midwest investigations editor, USA TODAY network
  • Arian Campo-Flores, staff reporter, The Wall Street Journal
  • Steve F. Huefner, legislation clinic director and elections law professor, Ohio State Moritz College of Law
  • Jen Miller, executive director, League of Women Voters of Ohio

If you have a disability and experience difficulty accessing this content request an accommodation.