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Former White House aid says Jim Jordan discussed Congressional pardons over January 6th

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, takes part in a discussion at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) on Feb. 26, 2022, in Orlando, Fla.
John Raoux
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AP
Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, takes part in a discussion at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) on Feb. 26, 2022, in Orlando, Fla.

A former aid for former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said central Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan discussed presidential pardons for members of congress connected to the January 6th insurrection, but never asked for one himself.

The testimony from Cassidy Hutchinson came Thursday before the House Select Committee investigating the attack on the Capitol.

A Twitter account for Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee chaired by Jordan called the testimony 100% fake news.

In a taped deposition shown during the hearing, NPR reported Hutchinson also said Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala. and Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., advocated for blanket pardons for House members who were involved in a Dec. 21 White House meeting.

Five days after the insurrection, Brooks, sent an email with the subject line "Pardons" to the White House requesting a pardon for Gaetz, himself and "every congressman or senator who voted to reject the electoral college vote submissions of Arizona and Pennsylvania."

Hutchinson testified she had heard that Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia had requested a pardon from the White House counsel's office, but did not communicate with Greene about that. No pardons were issued.

Eric Herschmann, a Trump White House lawyer, told the committee in a videotaped interview that Gaetz sought a pardon "from the beginning of time up until today, for any and all things."

No pardons were issued, NPR reported.

Information from NPR's reporting was used in this story.

Steve Brown grew up in nearby Richwood, Ohio and now lives there with his wife and sons. He started his journalism career as a weekend board operator at WOSU while majoring in journalism at Ohio State, where he also wrote for the student newspaper The Lantern and co-founded the organization Students for Public Broadcasting.