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Ohio State Suggests COVID-19 Patients Avoid Exercise For Up To Six Weeks

Ohio State running back Master Teague III runs for touchdown past Alabama defensive back Josh Jobe during the first half of the College Football Playoff national championship game, Monday, Jan. 11, 2021, in Miami Gardens, Fla.
Chris O'Meara
/
AP
Ohio State running back Master Teague III runs for touchdown past Alabama defensive back Josh Jobe during the first half of the College Football Playoff national championship game, Monday, Jan. 11, 2021, in Miami Gardens, Fla.

Ohio State University has issued new guidelines for avoiding exercise while recovering from COVID-19 – recommendations that the school is circumventing for its own student-athletes.

Under the latest guidance from the Wexner Medial Center, Ohio State says people should avoid exercise for two weeks after a COVID-19 diagnosis. Recovering patients should continue resting for the next four weeks, only making a gradual return to exercise.

“When you emerge from COVID, you need to plan for a transition period that allows you to build up to more intense exercise,” said Dr. James Borchers, a sports medicine specialist, in a press release.

In comparison, Ohio State allows student-athletes to return to play 17 days after a coronavirus diagnosis. All student-athletes who test positive for COVID-19 undergo testing for myocarditis, or inflammation of the heart. After the required testing, which includes an EKG and echocardiogram, a team physician can then clear athletes to compete again.

A university spokesman says this difference is because student-athletes work closely with team physicians in a way it can’t guarantee for the rest of the campus population.

“The recommendations for visitors to campus recreation facilities were developed in close consultation with Drs. Jim Borchers and Curt Daniels," reads a statement from Ohio State. "Dr. Borchers is head physician for the football team and was instrumental in designing the Big Ten Conference’s health and safety protocols."