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Columbus-Based Porter Wright Pulls Out Of Trump Campaign Lawsuit In Pennsylvania

 President Donald Trump speaks during a roundtable discussion with African-American supporters in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in Washington.
Patrick Semansky
/
AP
President Donald Trump speaks during a roundtable discussion with African-American supporters in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in Washington.

The Columbus-based law firm Porter Wright Morris & Arthur has filed to pull out of a case representing Donald Trump's campaign, which is attempting to challenge election results in Pennsylvania.

A week after all major media organizations called Pennsylvania, and the presidential election, for Democrat Joe Biden, the Trump campaign is still pursuing multiple lawsuits with baseless allegations of voter fraud. So far, the vast majority of those lawsuits have been dismissed by judges.

The case filed in Pennsylvania federal court challenges that state’s election process. It criticizes some counties for informing voters of problems with their ballot—something that Ohio election boards make an effort to do.

The filing also complains the state doesn’t disqualify ballots over signature mismatches. In October, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court unanimously ruled such rejections would not be allowed.

The Porter Wright filings from Thursday don’t elaborate on their reasons for withdrawal. In a statement, the firm acknowledged said it would uphold its obligation to ensure a smooth transition to substitute counsel, “so as not to cause material adverse effect on the client’s interest.”

The New York Times reports that Porter Wright employees, as well as outside organizations, had criticized the firm for participating in the Trump campaign's attempts to undermine the election process.

Porter Wright declined any further comment about the case.

On Friday, a federal appeals court in Philadelphia rejected a Republican candidate's attempt to block 9,300 ballots that arrived after Election Day. The panel noted the "unprecedented challenges" facing the nation, especially the "vast disruption" caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the Associated Press.