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Report Outlines How Ohio Lawmakers Can Steer Driverless Vehicle Industry

May Mobility, an Ann Arbor start-up, supplied the driverless shuttles hold five people and a fleet attendant, to Columbus. They did a similar experiment in Detroit.
Adora Namigadde
/
WOSU
May Mobility, an Ann Arbor start-up, supplied the driverless shuttles hold five people and a fleet attendant, to Columbus. They did a similar experiment in Detroit.

Both outgoing Gov. John Kasich and incoming Gov. Mike DeWine have talked about autonomous vehicles in Ohio’s economy. State lawmakers say they’ve been studying the industry for the last 14 months, and they’ve now issued a report on what they can do to help.

The report condenses what was learned over six hearings before the House Transportation and Public Safety Committee.

Chair Doug Green (R-Mt. Orab) said though other states are further ahead, Ohio needs to catch up. He says it can do so by maintaining and repairing current infrastructure while also integrating new technologies – and also by reviewing existing state law.

“We need to inventory the Ohio Revised Code to make sure there isn’t a stumbling block to the technology,” Green said.

Green says autos that can drive themselves almost without any driver input could be widely deployed in Ohio starting in a few months, and that level 5 vehicles – with full automation in all conditions – are expected in 2035.