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Some children change schools under No Child Left Behind Act

The No Child Left Behind Act, passed by congress in 2002, is intended to force schools to improve by creating testing requirements and milestone goals. If schools fail to meet the goals, the act offers parents the option of transferring their children from under performing schools, to ones that are doing better. But in Columbus not many parents are taking that option.

Columbus School officials have made sure parents realize they have the option of moving their children, but of the more 10,000 who could have transferred under No Child Left Behind, this year about 600 students switched to new schools. Others transferred through the district's parent choice lottery. Superintendent Gene Harris says moving children to new schools can be disruptive, so she hopes parents will consider their options carefully.

Tamara Keith has been a White House correspondent for NPR since 2014 and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast, the top political news podcast in America. Keith has chronicled the Trump administration from day one, putting this unorthodox presidency in context for NPR listeners, from early morning tweets to executive orders and investigations. She covered the final two years of the Obama presidency, and during the 2016 presidential campaign she was assigned to cover Hillary Clinton. In 2018, Keith was elected to serve on the board of the White House Correspondents' Association.