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Remembering The Victims Of The Weekend Synagogue Shooting

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now let's remember those who were killed in the Saturday attack in Pittsburgh.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yeah, Rose Mallinger was the oldest victim there. She was 97 years old. A former rabbi at the synagogue told NPR that she was in spirit, quote, "one of the younger ones among us."

INSKEEP: Daniel Stein was 71 and remembered for his kindness. His nephew told TribLive that he was somebody everybody liked, a man whose grandson was recently born.

GREENE: Melvin Wax, 88. He's remembered as a pillar of the New Light Congregation who unfailingly attended Friday, Saturday and Sunday services.

INSKEEP: Jerry Rabinowitz is 66 - was 66, a family doctor. One of his patients told local news that Rabinowitz was a healer with a truly uplifting demeanor.

GREENE: We also lost two brothers. Cecil Rosenthal was 59. David Rosenthal, 54. They shared an apartment near the synagogue. The vice president of the ACHIEVA residential program described them as inseparable and said in a statement, quote, "they were kind, good people with a strong faith and respect for everyone around."

INSKEEP: Bernice Simon was 84. Sylvan Simon, 86. They are remembered by neighbors as sweet and kind and generous. They were married at the Tree of Life synagogue in December of 1956, according to TribLive.

GREENE: Joyce Fienberg was 75. She was a researcher at the University of Pittsburgh's Learning and Research Development Center. She had two sons and was a grandmother.

INSKEEP: Richard Gottfried was 65 and shared a dentistry practice with his wife. He was said to be an avid runner and had been going to services at Tree of Life more often recently.

GREENE: Irving Younger, 69, ran a real estate business for many years and was also a youth football and baseball coach. A neighbor remembers him as the most wonderful dad and grandpa.

INSKEEP: Just a little of what we know, and you can read more remembrances of these men and women at npr.org. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.