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Dozens Arrested In Climate Protests, Oil Train Blockades

People walk past the United States Embassy during the The 100% Possible Climate March in Ottawa, on November 29, 2015. Some 150 leaders, including US President Barack Obama, China's Xi Jinping, India's Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin, will attend the start of the Paris conference, which is tasked with reaching the first truly universal climate pact, with the goal to limit average global warming to two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), perhaps less, over pre-Industrial Revolution levels by curbing fossil fuel emissions blamed for climate change.     (Patrick Doyle/AFP/Getty Images)
People walk past the United States Embassy during the The 100% Possible Climate March in Ottawa, on November 29, 2015. Some 150 leaders, including US President Barack Obama, China's Xi Jinping, India's Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin, will attend the start of the Paris conference, which is tasked with reaching the first truly universal climate pact, with the goal to limit average global warming to two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), perhaps less, over pre-Industrial Revolution levels by curbing fossil fuel emissions blamed for climate change. (Patrick Doyle/AFP/Getty Images)

Over the weekend, activists blockaded railroads in crude-oil hubs from Anacortes, Washington to Albany, New York. In the Pacific Northwest, police arrested 52 people at a protest campsite that disrupted BNSF Railway shipments from Friday until Sunday afternoon. And in upstate New York, protesters camped on railroad tracks at the Port of Albany, a major corridor for shipments of oil from North Dakota’s Bakken shale region. The campaign included events in Chicago, Los Angeles and Colorado, as well as in several other countries, from Brazil to Nigeria.

Marla Marcum, co-founder of the Climate Disobedience Center, who helped organize the Albany protest, speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

 

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