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How To Read China's Climate Pledges In Paris

People walk on a pedestrian overhead bridge as office buildings in Central Business District of Beijing are shrouded with heavy haze, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015. Beijing's red alerts for smog are as much about duration as they are about severity of pollution forecasts. The forecasting model must predict three or more days of smog with levels of 300 or higher on the city's air quality index - which typically would include having levels of dangerous PM 2.5 particles of about 10 times the safe level. (Andy Wong/AP Photo)
People walk on a pedestrian overhead bridge as office buildings in Central Business District of Beijing are shrouded with heavy haze, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015. Beijing's red alerts for smog are as much about duration as they are about severity of pollution forecasts. The forecasting model must predict three or more days of smog with levels of 300 or higher on the city's air quality index - which typically would include having levels of dangerous PM 2.5 particles of about 10 times the safe level. (Andy Wong/AP Photo)

Global climate talks continue today in Paris, the final week of the conference. One country that has dramatically changed its tune since the Copenhagen climate meeting six years ago is China.

China has gone from refusing to commit to action on climate change to what The Wall Street Journal describes as a cheerleader for action.

The Wall Street Journal’s Jason Bellini speaks with Here & Now‘s Eric Westervelt about the changes the country is making.

Guest

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