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How Northeast Ohio Cities Are Celebrating Halloween in 2020

Updated on October 1, 2020 at 9:30 a.m.

Leaves are falling from trees, Halloween is right around the corner and many Northeast Ohio communities are thinking about how to safely trick-or-treat, and so is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CDC officials say traditional trick-or-treating, where kids go door-to-door, is a high-risk activity when it comes to the spread of coronavirus. The Ohio Department of Health also recommends minimizing risk by letting kids pick up treats from at least six feet away.

Cleveland announced Wednesday that children are allowed to trick-or-treat, but the city is strongly discouraging it. If residents do still decide to trick-or-treat, Cleveland recommends they follow the Ohio Department of Health guidelines. 

The city will instead offer candy bags at City of Cleveland Neighborhood Resource and Recreation Centers (NRRCs) on October 30 from 6-7 p.m., to provide an alternative to traditional trick-or-treating. 

All of the NRRCs will supply candy bags with the exception of the following: Halloran, Sterling, Hamilton, Kovacic and Camp Forbes.

Some local communities, like Lakewood near Cleveland’s west side, are encouraging creative ways to hand out candy, such as using a candy slide made of PVC pipe. 

Fairlawn, a town outside of Akron, is letting neighborhoods decide how to handle trick-or-treating, said Laurie Beisecker, Parks and Recreation director.

“The requirements that the governor has for us to follow are just really strong, so if you sponsor it as a city, and something happens, they can technically come back on us, and say, ‘This wasn’t a great idea'," Beisecker said.

Strongsville, Rocky River, and Cuyahoga Heights are going forward with trick-or-treating as usual.

Other cities, like Cleveland Heights, have not announced specific plans.

The CDC is also recommending the use of Halloween-themed cloth masks instead of traditional masks. Costume masks will not protect the user from the spread of the virus but the two should not be used together – the combination can make it difficult for kids to breathe, CDC officials are warning.

 

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