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Coronavirus

DeWine Hints He Won't Sign Bill Banning All Mandatory Vaccines

Kent State University student Regan Raeth of Hudson, Ohio, has her COVID-19 vaccination administered by Kent State nurse Kristen Barath in Kent, Ohio on April 8, 2021.
Phil Long
/
AP
Kent State University student Regan Raeth of Hudson, Ohio, has her COVID-19 vaccination administered by Kent State nurse Kristen Barath in Kent, Ohio on April 8, 2021.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine spoke out on a bill that would ban mandatory vaccines and so-called vaccine passports, which has been set for a four-hour long hearing next Tuesday, during the legislative break.

DeWine also suggested that he’d have a hard time signing it.

The governor said he’s surprised that a lawmaker would propose House Bill 248 that would ban vaccines from childhood inoculations to meningitis shots. He said hospitals should decide how to keep their patients safe and schools shouldn’t be told they can’t require certain shots.

“That goes against local control and so I’m surprised by that and certainly, you know, it’s, bills that I’ve looked at, I’m certainly not in favor of doing that," DeWine said.

The bill bans vaccine mandates by schools, daycare centers, nursing homes, health care providers, insurers, colleges and universities and employers. It would also ban any entity from refusing service or treating unvaccinated people differently from those who’ve had their shots.

The bill doesn't deal with mandatory COVID-19 vaccines in public colleges and universities. Those are banned under a law that takes effect in October that prohibits requiring vaccines that don't have full FDA approval.

DeWine had said when he signed it that he was hoping COVID vaccines would have that full approval by the time the law went into effect. The governor also said he doesn't have any problem with colleges requiring COVID shots before the law takes effect.

A hearing on the bill in June got national attention, largely because it featured false information about COVID vaccines. Among those who testified was Dr. Sherri Tenpenny, named as one of the "disinformation dozen" providing the bulk of disinformation about COVID shots on social media.

She was deplatformed by Twitter after her testimony, in which she suggested that there are investigations into the vaccines "magnetizing" people or "interfacing" with 5G cell towers.

Copyright 2021 The Statehouse News Bureau. To see more, visit The Statehouse News Bureau.