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Classical 101

Music to Brighten the Dark Days

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[caption id="attachment_13501" align="alignright" width="150" caption="WOSU's classical music staff: Jennifer Hambrick, Beverley Ervine, John Rittmeyer, Christopher Purdy and Boyce Lancaster"][/caption] [audio] What do you do when you're blue? Maybe you curl up with a good book. Maybe you take a bubble bath. Or maybe you put on some music, sit down in your old overstuffed easy chair and just let the good sounds wash over you. If you do find yourself occasionally seeking musical solace, what tunes do you reach for most? Do you brood with Beethoven, or cry with Corelli? Do you lament with Liszt, grieve with Grieg, or wail with Wagner? (I know that last example was a stretch. Just go with it.) I asked my colleagues on WOSU's classical music staff all of these questions (minus the alliteration) recently, and they were generous enough to let me record their responses. Truthfully, I made things a bit difficult for my co-workers in asking them to tell us about only the top three pieces of music that would see them through their dark days. They all looked at me like I had three heads. In fact, Boyce Lancaster full-out heckled me about this - on tape, I might add - right at the beginning of our conversation: [audio:introduction-and-heckling.mp3] So I share the results of our recent chatfest with you here. Our selections were rather wide ranging, encompassing some works you might well imagine on a "dark days" list and others that might surprise you. And some of our lists included not just classical music, but also music in other genres. But mainly our chatfest revealed bits and pieces about who each of us really is. I now suspect Boyce Lancaster has tasted tomato martinis, and I now know that Virginia hill music is in Beverley Ervine's blood and that  John Rittmeyer sees Boyce's Beethoven's Fifth and raises him a Ninth. About me? Well, my zucchini plants make an appearance in our conversation (yes, there is a musical connection) and, in a WOSU exclusive, I tell all about my Brandenburg Concerto obsession. So listen, enjoy and write in about the pieces and recordings you listen to on your dark days! Part One: [audio:part-1-classical-musci-ideas-festival-2.mp3] Part Two: [audio:part-2-classical-music-ideas-festival-2-11-aug-2010.mp3] - Jennifer Hambrick