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Arts & Culture

Columbus Kicks Off Weeklong Sullivant Public Art Project

 Mayor Andrew Ginther kicks off the start of the Sullivant Bright public art project, where 21 artists will paint temporary murals and other art installations along Sullivant Avenue.
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Mayor Andrew Ginther kicks off the start of the Sullivant Bright public art project, where 21 artists will paint temporary murals and other art installations along Sullivant Avenue.

The City of Columbus kicked off the start of a weeklong public art project Monday afternoon to improve the West side.

The project will have 21 artists spending this week painting temporary pavement murals and other art installations such as poetry written on sidewalks at soon-to-be construction locations for next year along Sullivant Avenue.

Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther said the public art created this week is part of the Sullivant Bright effort and the city's $10 million infrastructure project on Sullivant Avenue between I-70 and Hague Avenue. This will include the construction of curb extensions for bus riders and walkers, as well as add more streetlights and traffic signals.

"This project is about more than revitalizing the streets, the sidewalks and other critical infrastructure," he said. "It's about revitalizing lives."

Within the $10 million, $200,000 will be set aside for public art that has been influenced by community input.

Muralist Francesca Miller is one of the artists working on the project this week. Miller said while she only began to paint murals last year, it's an honor for her to be a part of the project as a way to bring the community together.

"This is what a collaborative effort looks like to make our city beautiful, to make our city a safe space, a welcoming space," she said.

For Greater Hilltop commissioner Zerqa Abid, she said she is happy that the city is taking positive steps to brighten the streets — especially for the children of the neighborhood.

"We know that our precious children deserve this art on the streets, and they will very much enjoy it," she said.