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A Crisis In Slow Motion: California Enters Fourth Year Of Drought

Low water levels are visible at Lake McClure on March 24, 2015, in La Grange, California. More than 3,000 residents in the Sierra Nevada foothill community of Lake Don Pedro who rely on water from Lake McCLure could potentially run out of water in the near future if the severe drought continues. Lake McClure is currently at 7 percent of its normal capacity and residents are under mandatory 50 percent water use restrictions. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Low water levels are visible at Lake McClure on March 24, 2015, in La Grange, California. More than 3,000 residents in the Sierra Nevada foothill community of Lake Don Pedro who rely on water from Lake McCLure could potentially run out of water in the near future if the severe drought continues. Lake McClure is currently at 7 percent of its normal capacity and residents are under mandatory 50 percent water use restrictions. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Today the California State Senate will take up an emergency $1.1 billion water management bill. That legislation has the support of the governor and the leaders of both political parties, and is expected to pass easily.

But government leaders all acknowledge that it will take much more than this to deal with California’s water crisis. Is the government doing enough to deal with the serious drought? Katie Orr of Capital Public Radio in Sacramento discusses this with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Guest

  • Katie Orr, state government reporter for Capital Public Radio in Sacramento. She tweets @1KatieOrr.

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